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Use Adam Scott’s grip hack to hold the club perfectly every time

This hack will help you grip the club perfectly.

GOLF.com

Welcome to Play Smart, a regular GOLF.com game-improvement column that will help you play smarter, better golf.

Adam Scott is one of the best ball strikers in the modern game — and after you get one glance at his swing, you understand why. It’s the perfect mix of balance and power, and there are few swings in the game that can match its aesthetic.

The reason he can move the club with such grace is a near-perfect grasp off the fundamentals. He hones in on these “boring” details with such precision that when it’s time to swing the club, he’s in the perfect position for success.

One of these fundamentals is a grip that’s nice and neutral — not too strong and not too weak. But how does he make sure he’s gripping the club the same way every time? If you watch his pre-shot routine, you’ll see a subtle little hack he incorporates that makes his grip the same every time.

Adam Scott’s grip hack

Before Scott addresses the ball, he stands behind it and visualizes the shot, much like other pros do. Next, he holds the club in his left hand out to the side and turns the clubface so it’s looking directly at the target.

It might look odd at first glance, but this next part is where the genius comes into play. With the clubface pointed at the target, he grips the club with the back of his left hand facing the target and his thumb pointed toward him. After doing this, he walks into the shot and places his right hand on the grip.

This accomplishes a couple of things. One, it makes sure that his left hand is gripping the club in the same manner on every shot. And two, it helps create a perfectly neutral grip. With his left thumb pointing down the shaft, all he has to do is put his right hand on top and he will have a neutral, near-perfect grip.

If you’re someone who struggles with their grip — or can’t seem to grip the club consistently — give this method a try. It might look a little odd, but if it works for the likes of a Masters champ, it’s sure to have some benefit for your game, too.

Zephyr Melton

Golf.com Editor

Zephyr Melton is an assistant editor for GOLF.com where he spends his days blogging, producing and editing. Prior to joining the team at GOLF, he attended the University of Texas followed by stops with the Texas Golf Association, Team USA, the Green Bay Packers and the PGA Tour. He assists on all things instruction and covers amateur and women’s golf. He can be reached at zephyr_melton@golf.com.